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Full Version: Is it possible to have a single user environment
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fullur
I want to have a single login account with Full Super User priviliges. Preferably without the name being "root". So is there a way that can be set up?
DS2K3
It's called Windows.
fullur
My apologies. I assumed that on a linux forum my question would be assumed to be about linux. Since it wasn't, allow me to rephrase. Is it possible to configure linux as a single user environment? (And in case you're wondering, yes I caught the sarcasm.)
Termina
QUOTE (fullur @ May 27 2006, 12:28 PM)
My apologies. I assumed that on a linux forum my question would be assumed to be about linux. Since it wasn't, allow me to rephrase. Is it possible to configure linux as a single user environment? (And in case you're wondering, yes I caught the sarcasm.)

*laughs* Good one, fullur.

You could always use 'sudo', but if you want to quick and dirty way, just add a user and edit /etc/passwd

Replace the 'uid' to 0.

For example:

Change
will:x:1001:100::/home/will:/bin/bash

To
wil2:x:0:100::/home/will:/bin/bash


Also, single-user mode can be achieved by typing in 'init 1'

Why do you want to do this, though? smile.gif I'm curious.
fullur
Thank you for the info. The reason is that while I know a multi-user environment has advantages, I really don't feel that I need them. All I really want is to not have to swith back to root whenever I want to change some piece of configuration. i.e. using the yum gui to install or remove a program. I also had an issue where I used yum gui to install the apache server, but then when I went to edit my web pages with my regular user, but I didn't have rights to any of the files. ohmy.gif I'm sure that one would not have been as big of a problem if I knew how to change file rights en mass though...
Termina
To change every folder/file in a particular location, you can do the following:

chmod -R 755 /path/to
chown -R username /path/to
chgrp -R groupname /path/to
fullur
Sweet! Thanks for the help. biggrin.gif
DS2K3
IMO, the mutli-user nature of Linux & UNIX in general is possibly the single most important feature in terms of overall system security. There are huge numbers of reasons why virtually no distribution (with the exception of "Linspire") let normal users run as root. My favourite being "rm -R /"

Generally, if you take the time to set your file permissions on file in your home directory, and any shared folders, there is no need to become root unless you are changing configuration around. Even then, if you elarn the shortcuts to becoming root (like using "su -" in a console) you can quickly and easily get root privilege temporarily without losing the layers of secueity and resilience introduced by the multi-user model.

Sorry if my first reply sounded rude - It was merely intended to impart just what a bad idea I think running as root is...

D
Termina
QUOTE (DS2K3 @ May 28 2006, 05:04 AM)
IMO, the mutli-user nature of Linux & UNIX in general is possibly the single most important feature in terms of overall system security. There are huge numbers of reasons why virtually no distribution (with the exception of "Linspire") let normal users run as root. My favourite being "rm -R /"

Generally, if you take the time to set your file permissions on file in your home directory, and any shared folders, there is no need to become root unless you are changing configuration around. Even then, if you elarn the shortcuts to becoming root (like using "su -" in a console) you can quickly and easily get root privilege temporarily without losing the layers of secueity and resilience introduced by the multi-user model.

Sorry if my first reply sounded rude - It was merely intended to impart just what a bad idea I think running as root is...

D

What next, we should use passwords and not allow password-less logins with SSH? Blashphemy! wink.gif

I certainly agree with you DS2K3, hopefully my reply re: changing permissions helps.

Also fullur, you can always change httpd.conf (VirtualHosts) so that a directory in your users (non-root!) home directory is what your web page is serving. That way, you don't have to worry about permissions (changing files to nobody or www-data can be annoying, I know smile.gif)
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