Help - Search - Members - Calendar
Full Version: Debian Etch, KDE, mount removable media
Linuxhelp > Support > Technical Support
redg
I'm trying to mount removable media read/write using KDE's removable media manager, no problem mounting usb flash devices, these seem to mount read/write by default, but when I try to mount my firewire hard drive (NTFS) it only mounts as read. The KDE manager allows users to mount removable media on the fly, I don't know what apps make this possible in the background. You just open Konqueror and click the Storage Media link, you are then confronted with a list of all media, clicking on them mounts the media.

So I guess my question is, what's the difference between mounting a USB flash drive, and mounting a firewire HD, is it the FS, Fat vs NTFS, or does something act differently because one device uses USB, the other uses Firewire?

Any help appreciated.

redg
Jim
That is because linux doesn't have a stable NTFS write yet. There is some research into it, and some people claim they have it working, but by and large NTFS is only read at this point.

If your firewire hard drive was VFAT it would mount it read/write just fine. Yeap, sorry, but thats the way it is right now.
redg
Hi Jim,

Thanks for that, so I can give up writing to an NTFS partition from Linux?

What I'm trying to achieve, is to have this external drive as backup drive for both my WinXP boot and my Linux boot on the same system, what FS do you suggest I format this drive as?

redg
michaelk
Using FAT32 for sharing data is the most compatible. However, the one limitation is max file size of 4GB.
Jim
Who has files that are larger than 4GB? Ya, vfat is the best "shared" drive format. Thats what I use for any drive that has stuff that I need from both linux and windows.
redg
VFAT for windows is a virtual file system which is now pretty much obsolete, is this different for Linux, are we talking about two different technologies?

redg
michaelk
vfat is the linux filesystem type for FAT32.

Not sure what you mean by virtual. NTFS should be the filesystem of choice for XP and W2K. FAT32 might be obsolete but it is far from being dead. Flash drives, digital camera memory cards, many MP3 players and most external hard drives (USB etc) are still formated as FAT.
redg
vfat windows stands for virtual file allocation table, it was software rather than an actual file system. It was a compatibility layer that allowed Win95 machines to store long file names on older FAT systems that did not support long file names.

I've been doing some googling and it seems this may be the same for Linux vfat, it's simply a compatibility layer between Linux which uses long file names, and older Microsoft FAT file systems that do not support long file names. It is not needed when using FAT32.

Anyway back to my original problem, on your advice, I've formatted my portable drive as FAT32 and everything is working just fine. It is easily mounted by users as read/write.

Thank you Jim and Michael, problem solved again. biggrin.gif

redg
Termina
QUOTE (Jim @ Dec 9 2005, 02:50 AM)
That is because linux doesn't have a stable NTFS write yet. There is some research into it, and some people claim they have it working, but by and large NTFS is only read at this point.

If your firewire hard drive was VFAT it would mount it read/write just fine. Yeap, sorry, but thats the way it is right now.

CAPTIVE has been quite stable, in my experience. Atleast when it comes to Windows XP partitions (not sure what version of NTFS that, only that it's diffrent than 2K)
This is a "lo-fi" version of our main content. To view the full version with more information, formatting and images, please click here.
Invision Power Board © 2001-2017 Invision Power Services, Inc.