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sixtwoten
I am looking to completely move from Windows to Linux but there are some questions before I do that.

1. How can I find out disk information, such as total space, used space, free space, disk health?

2. Is there any good way to rename multiple files according to various criteria? The criteria may include dates, name, location, author, or other such attributes. So for example if I want to change the names of files in a particular folder that were created on a particular date, how can I do it easily?

3. Is there some way to have a script or shortcut to enable, disable, start, and stop services? How else can the services be modified? In Windows I usually go to the Computer Management part of the Administrative Tools.

4. Windows has Documents and Settings for user settings and Program Files for all software files. Plus it stores settings in the registry and shares software code called Dynamic Link Library. What is the mechanism in Linux?

5. Is there some way to specify which programs should open files of particular types by default? For example, a txt file opens with a text editor of the user's choice and an mp3 file opens with her favorite media player? Also, please explain the concept of file extensions in Linux. Is it the same as in Windows?

6. In Windows, executable files have the extension of exe. Which files are considered executable in Linux?

I am sure as I explore more of Linux, I will have more questions smile.gif
DS2K3
1 - Use the "free" command. Disk health is less of an issue, since generally they dont get fragemented. They should ger scanned every 100 mounts or so

2 - Im not sure, I have never tried...

3 - Some distros (like Mandrake) have a control panel to do this. But virtually all distros have sctiprs in /etc/init.d to do it

4 - All settimgs are stored int eh user's home directory (normally in hidden folders). There is no registry. Code is kept in libraries

5 - KDE and Gnome both support this. As do most other desktop managers. Extensions are usewd by Linux, but to different degreees by different desktop managers and programs.

6 - They have no extension... They do have to be chmod'ed executable though. They can be given extensions I tihnk, but they generally dont have one
sixtwoten
Is it possible to copy files that a program needs to run and then put these files in the required folders on another computer making a new installation? In another scenario, can an installed program's files be backed up so that if we reinstall Linux, all we have to do is copy the backup files to the correct location for the program to be installed and ready to go?
DS2K3
I suppose so - But in practice it's a bit more fiddly since programs tend to be quite spread out (config in etc, binaries in bin etc. etc.). You could easily do it for a whole system, but program for program would be a bit of a headache. Far easier just to keep a copy of the source code or rpm/deb etcc

D
Corey
QUOTE (sixtwoten @ May 23 2005, 11:38 AM)
2. Is there any good way to rename multiple files according to various criteria? The criteria may include dates, name, location, author, or other such attributes. So for example if I want to change the names of files in a particular folder that were created on a particular date, how can I do it easily?

There are methods of doing this using a combination of different linux commands. I'm sure there are graphical tools out there that may help you acheive this, but if you wanted to do this using console commands, off the top of my head, you would probably need to use the find and mv commands.
sixtwoten
The idea is to copy all the files and just copy them to another disk and have created a clone to the first system. Now if the original disk has some problems or something, we just copy the file from the clone back to the original: we now have a functioning system on the original disk... is this possible for system files as well as files for the programs installed? In Windows just by copying the files doesn't install a program. I wanted to know if Linux allows us to install programs by manually putting files where they ought to be. Just a thought because I know installing from RPM or other tools is easier than this.
DS2K3
If you copy the whole system, then yeh, you can just copy it back. Since Linux doesnt have a "registry" like widnows does, all the config etc. is stored as files. You need to preserve the file permissions though, otherwise things screw up.

D
Corey
The safest way, in my experiences, to copy full filesystems is with:

cp -a /foo/source /foo/destination
dishawjp
Actually the "tar" command was originally designed to back up drives to tape and is a great tool for maintaining backups.

See "man tar" for a complete description, but briefly, if you wanted to backup your entire /home directory and its subdirectories and then compress the file, the command would be:

tar -czvf /home.tgz /home

HTH,

Jim Dishaw
DS2K3
Just an edit to my first post, "free" dispalys RAM/Swap info - For actual HD space, use "df"

D
sixtwoten
When making a GUI-based program such as OpenOffice, is the GUI made for a specific desktop environment such as GNOME or KDE? Or can I make a standard GUI that works on all standards-based environments (if there are any such standards)?

Is it possible to create programs that run from the terminal or act as services and then add GUI to it? So that now we can run the program in both terminal and desktop mode.
DS2K3
If you ahve GNOME and KDE then GTK (Gnome UI) and QT (KDE UI) apps can run on either. Genreally people have both. OpenOffice runs under either, I tihnk it uses a built-in UI system (possibly just asking X to do it with nthing in between) since it also looks about the same on Windows.

Loads of software runs from the command line with a GUI on top, so yeh.

D
Corey
There are distributions that release KDE-flavored versions of OpenOffice as well, they look quite nice actually.
sixtwoten
Is there a universal (central, general) uninstall routine in Linux, just like in Windows? Or the different package managers like YUM, APT, and RPM have their own? So like if I install using RPM, then I can uninstall only using the RPM system. Is it possible to install using one manager and uninstall using another?

I want to express my appreciation for all the help received to date.
Corey
It's usually about which distribution you are using. Redhat, Fedora, Mandrake, SUSE, etc. use RPM, and they all have different interfaces for adding and removing packages. At the very base, they use 'rpm -e' to uninstall a binary package. Debian uses apt-get remove which is just an interface for 'dpkg -r'. Gentoo uses 'emerge unmerge', source based software installs usually involve changing into the source tree directory and running 'make uninstall'.

It's really all a matter of how it was installed.
sixtwoten
As Linux is open source, is the source code for various distributions available? For example, I recently tried out the Ubuntu Live CD and found it interesting. Now if someone wanted to see the source code for say the utility they have called the "System Monitor", would the guys making the distribution have to release it? I am interested in the programming side of Linux as well and I am curious as to how can one find the source code for the various (smaller) utilities.
Corey
Chances are with Ubuntu, the source code is available somewhere, most like from their FTP site. Any software that is released under the GPL and LGPL licenses are freely available to you or anybody else to look at, tinker with, and use in your own projects. If you plan on using GPL'd code in your project, you must release your source code under the same license. I'm not fully up on the GPL, but that is my understanding of it.

So, virtually all software for Linux, you can get the source code for and do whatever you want with it. It's great!
sixtwoten
Is there any firewall in Linux similar to Sygate or ZoneAlarm? I am looking for one that allows the user to open ports for applications and services AND notifies when a program wants to access the network/Internet and then the user decides whether to grant permission.
sixtwoten
Is Linux truly multi-user? Is the following scenario possible in Linux?

There is one computer with about 4 users. These four users want to connect to the computer remotely using remote desktop technology such as VNC.

Can all of them simultaneously use the same computer from remote locations, all of them seeing their own desktops? Also, if they log in to the computer simultaneously using putty, can they do it?
DS2K3
They can all use Te;net/SSH simultaneously, and they can all run X-programs and ahve them popup on their local machine. However, I dont think VNC itself is truly multi-user, so I dont think they could all VNC at once.

D
sixtwoten
So if not VNC, which application can allow all these things?
sixtwoten
"Like previous versions of Windows based on the NT kernel (Windows NT variations and Windows 2000), Windows XP uses a service model to accomplish its various tasks. A service is a small program that runs in the background that lets Windows do certain things." ( Source: http://tinyurl.com/dkrmz )

Does Linux also work on services?
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