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> How can I take ownership of ntfs folders
icyj
post Mar 30 2006, 06:37 PM
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Here is my situation. I have just installed Suse 10 on my desktop. I have a total of three hard drives on that computer. I installed suse on one, and left the other two drives alone. They are both formatted with ntfs and contain files that I do not want to delete or format over. With a fresh install of suse, I have only read priviledges of the two ntfs drives. Is there any way I can take ownership of those two drives so that I can read, write, and modify the files that currently exist on those drives; and do so where as not to damage any of the stored files? Also, I know only some of the basic Linux commands, so if you could explain in detail, it would be very much appreciated! Thanks in advance... smile.gif
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Robert83
post Mar 31 2006, 05:07 AM
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Hi,

the read only thing is because NTFS support is still in it's early stages, and writing to a NTFS formated disk would eventualy completely destroy the file system, so it's not reccomended. If you only use Suse on that computer, then I would recommend that you either format the disk with ext3 partition, or if you are really-really-really lazy, grab yourself a copy of partition magic 8 , and convert those NTFS drives to FAT32. (but the first idea ext3, would be better smile.gif ).

Sincerely
Robert B


--------------------
Robert Becskei
robert83@linuxhelp.net
--------------------
May the source be with us!
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DFI Lanparty UT4 NF4 ULTRA-D
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icyj
post Mar 31 2006, 09:14 AM
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Thanks for the quick reply. I have another quick question for you. The two ntfs drives I have are identical to each other, meaning all the data I have on the one is also backed up on the other (doubt it matters, one drive is ide and the other sata). Now could I convert one of those two drives to ext3, and then copy the contents of the remaining ntfs drive onto the ext3 formatted drive safely? And what program would you recommend I use to format a drive from ntfs to ext3 (Im still a little new to Linux)?
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Robert83
post Mar 31 2006, 10:47 AM
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Hi,

first of all you login to linux, and open up a terminal then type as root

CODE
fdisk -l


this will list all hard drives/partition on the disk allong with partition type space etc...

the sata disk will probably be /dev/sda or something , and if you are saying that the drive is a exact copy of the ide drive which is probably /dev/hdb or /dev/hdc or /dev/hdd , this depends if it's primary master (dev/hda) , slave (dev/hdb) , secondary master (dev/hdc) slave (dev/hdd).

You will need to delete the partition on the NTFS disk IDE for example if you wish.

CODE
fdisk /dev/hdb

if the NTFS disk is /dev/hdb
press m to list help
then press d , to delete a partition
type partition number you wish to delete, if it's a one primary partition taking up all disk space , type 1 then enter.
then you press w , which write new partition table to disk.

then once again you do a
CODE
fdisk /dev/hdb

press n to add a new paritition , chose primary parition , then press 1, then press enter, enter again, and finaly press w , and then once you are back to console. Type the following.

CODE
mkfs.ext3 /dev/hdb

this will take a while to format as ext3 partition.

then we create a directory in which we will mount this paritition
CODE
mkdir /bigdrive
mount /dev/hdb1 /bigdrive


now /dev/hdb1 new 120GB ext3 partition is mounted under /bigdrive

to make this permanent you need to add a entry into /etc/fstab
CODE
/dev/hdb1         /bigdrive               ext3    defaults        1 2


Sincerely
Robert B

ps.: carefull with above commands!


--------------------
Robert Becskei
robert83@linuxhelp.net
--------------------
May the source be with us!
--------------------
AMD X2-3800 @ 2400Mhz
2048MB DDR 400Mhz
DFI Lanparty UT4 NF4 ULTRA-D
GeForce 7800GT
250GB+250GB
Pioneer DVD-RW
17inch Samsung Syncmaster 757NF
WinXP Pro (SP2)/ CentOS 4.3
--------------------
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