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> How To Access 2nd Hard Drive, How do I access my second hard disk
jimc5
post Aug 8 2004, 11:08 AM
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I am a newbie and trying to learn my way around my new Linux system. I have SUSE 9.1 and KDE 3.2. Of course, I am also a Windows user and am most familiar with this file system. In Windows, the device is addressed with an alphabetical letter...
i.e., c: is assigned by the Windows operating sytem to the first hard disk on IDE 0 Master. Thus, in Windows Explorer, one
may see that one is working with a particular hard disk.

I added a second hard disk to IDE 0, Slave. I know that hda is the primary hard drive on which Linux is installed. I also know,
that hdb is the second hard disk device. However, in the KDE File Manager, all I see is the root of the primary hard disk or "/"
I don't know how to get to my second hard disk or to access it to install programs, store stuff, etc. It would seem to me
that there would be a root "/" for each device such as "hda /" and "hdb /" something like Windows...so I can tell which device
I am working. Ok, well, I am not here to re-invent the Linux file system by any means. I do want to know, though, how Linux
users access which hard disk and how it is done. It can't be that hard, can it?

Still trying to figure out how this all works...file system and hard disk devices. Can someone more brilliant and experienced
than me, please give me a simple, effective explanation and a simple way, to access my second hard disk? Thank you!
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hughesjr
post Aug 8 2004, 11:14 AM
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After you add a new drive, you have to make a filesystem on it and mount it ... or if the drive already contains info and partitions, you just need to mount it.

When it gets mounted, it is where ever you put it in the file system (more on this later).

Does the drive already contain info that you want to keep ... or do you want to erase everything and make it available for Linux?


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Johnny Hughes
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Enterprise Alternatives: CentOS, WhiteBoxEL
Favorite Workstation Distros (in order): CentOS, Gentoo, Debian Sarge, Ubuntu, Mandrake, FedoraCore, Slackware, SUSE
Favorite Server Distros (in order): CentOS, WhiteBoxEL, Debian Sarge, Slackware, Mandrake, FedoraCore, Gentoo, SUSE
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jimc5
post Aug 8 2004, 01:12 PM
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QUOTE (hughesjr @ Aug 8 2004, 11:14 AM)
After you add a new drive, you have to make a filesystem on it and mount it ... or if the drive already contains info and partitions, you just need to mount it.

When it gets mounted, it is where ever you put it in the file system (more on this later).

Does the drive already contain info that you want to keep ... or do you want to erase everything and make it available for Linux?

I am pretty sure that it is formated with Reiser. I have not done anything else with it since I installed Linux on the
primary drive. So, I am a little ignorant here of really, what to do.

Perhaps you can enlighten me. What would you do, if you were adding a second hard disk?
How to|steps needed...that is what I am looking for...

All I can tell you is, I had the second hard disk in the computer when I put SUSE 9.1 on it.
Now I want to access it and use it.

Thank you! cool.gif
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michaelk
post Aug 8 2004, 03:04 PM
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In a nutshell... i.e all files, hard drives and devices like CDROMS drive etc are all in the same tree with / being the top. For example your CDROM drive is /media/cdrom. There isn't a seperate c: or d: like windows. If your 2nd drive was present during the install then unless you assigned a mount point it probably isn't formated with a linux filesystem.

I am not too familar with yast so here are some console commands to look at your 2nd hard drive. You need to be logged in as root and open up a console window. Post the output of the command.

fdisk -l /dev/hdb (thats a small L)

This will show you how the drive is partitioned and the partition ID types. You will just see that a partition has a linux filesystem but you can not tell if it is ext3 or reiserfs etc.

Before you can mount the drive you will need to create a directory to be used as a mount point.
mkdir /media/hdb1 (You can name it anything. hdb1 will depend on the ouput of the fdisk command)
To mount the drive manually as root
mount -t auto /dev/hdb1 /mnt/hdb1

I have used auto because I do not know how the drive is formated. You will want to use the actual filesystem type if known.

To unmount
unmount /mnt/hdb1
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hughesjr
post Aug 9 2004, 06:27 PM
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If you need to create a partition ... use the fdisk command, like this:

fdisk /dev/hdb

Use m to see a menu ... p to print the current partition table, d to remove partitions or n to create new partitions. Once you have the partitions the way you want, press w to save them.

After you exit, create a file system like this:

For ext3:
mke2fs -j /dev/hdb1
(repeat for other partitions (ie for /dev/hdb2).

For ReiserFS use:
mkreiserfs /dev/hdb1
(if you have mkreiserfs installed ... repeat for other partitions added)

Then create a directory and mount as michaelk suggested.


--------------------
Johnny Hughes
hughesjr@linuxhelp.net
Enterprise Alternatives: CentOS, WhiteBoxEL
Favorite Workstation Distros (in order): CentOS, Gentoo, Debian Sarge, Ubuntu, Mandrake, FedoraCore, Slackware, SUSE
Favorite Server Distros (in order): CentOS, WhiteBoxEL, Debian Sarge, Slackware, Mandrake, FedoraCore, Gentoo, SUSE
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eizo
post Aug 10 2004, 08:29 AM
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I have suse 9, and it finds new drives by itself. Suse should map windows drives in KDE on your desktop automaticly. Suse takes care of windows drives while installing and puts them in /windows/c, /windows/C, /windows/d, /windows/D, etc... mount points.

If you added disk physicaly later(after install), you should add its informations with YAST parititioning module and then use vfat for FAT32 and /windows/c for mount point. YAST will tell you, what devices and parititions it has found (hdbx where x is paritition number). Just select windows paritition, EDIT it:assign filesystem type, and mount point, and it should be it... Take care though... Backup disk...
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