Linux Help
guides forums blogs
Home Desktops Distributions ISO Images Logos Newbies Reviews Software Support & Resources Linuxhelp Wiki

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )



Advanced DNS Management
New ZoneEdit. New Managment.

FREE DNS Is Back

Sign Up Now
 
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Root User & Graphical Environment, - also question on Jed
gjhicks
post Apr 1 2004, 02:09 PM
Post #1


Whats this Lie-nix Thing?
*

Group: Members
Posts: 9
Joined: 1-April 04
Member No.: 2,690



Hello,

I am another "new to linux" person. I am using Mandrake 9.0 and (generally) Gnome.

I have read in many places that the 'root' user should not use a graphical environment. I am happy to follow this advice but Mandrake keeps using a graphical environment when I log in as 'root'. The annoying thing is the message warning that this is not a good idea but only offering 'continue' or 'logout' as options - why not a 'login in terminal mode option'? Anyway, can anyone help with how to set up Mandrake (or is it Gnome?) to use a terminal for 'root' and graphical for the other users?

Another (probably even more silly) question involves Jed. My system 'remove programs' utility says that the Jed editor (plus its associated files) are able to be removed. However, I can't find them anywhere on the disk! I have tried finding them with the Gnome 'file search' and at a prompt with 'locate'. Any ideas?

Lastly, am I right in saying that, presuming I find this editor, it should be in the path to execute?

Thanks,

Geoff.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Robert83
post Apr 1 2004, 03:02 PM
Post #2


Its GNU/Linuxhelp.net
*******

Group: Support Specialist
Posts: 1,439
Joined: 3-January 04
From: Germany
Member No.: 2,069



Hi,

Well I think that it's NOT true that the root user should not use the Graphical Environment, it's also true that you CANOT do everything in GUI mode, some changes just need to be done in console. The only thing that I would reccomend is, never login as root when you don't need to, it's just a bit risky ,since in this mode you can do real damage to the system...as for that root non gui mode, and other use gui mode, I don't know how to do that thing,but I'll will have a look ...maybe I can find something.

The other thing about jad,
you can quickly find out if it's installed
by typing in the following command in a terminal window

rpm -q jad [this will show jad version number if it's installed, or if it was installed using a rpm package, it won't show you jad if you installed it from source]

and if you would like to remove it [this can be done only if you're root]
rpm -e jad-name-reported-back-by-rpm-q-jad

Sincerely
Robert B


--------------------
Robert Becskei
robert83@linuxhelp.net
--------------------
May the source be with us!
--------------------
AMD X2-3800 @ 2400Mhz
2048MB DDR 400Mhz
DFI Lanparty UT4 NF4 ULTRA-D
GeForce 7800GT
250GB+250GB
Pioneer DVD-RW
17inch Samsung Syncmaster 757NF
WinXP Pro (SP2)/ CentOS 4.3
--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Jim
post Apr 1 2004, 03:38 PM
Post #3


Its GNU/Linuxhelp.net
*******

Group: Support Specialist
Posts: 1,280
Joined: 19-November 03
From: University of Minnesota- TC
Member No.: 1,828



I wouldn't worry so much about not going into root in graphical mode. I think people say that just so its more difficult to do things in root so your not as likely to screw something up. As long as you pay attention to what you are doing wile you are in root you should be fine.

Don't worry about forcing your mandrake to log root in at the command line, its not worth the effort. Just be careful, thats your best bet. Another good thing is to keep back ups of key files like XF86Config, lilo.conf, fstab, inittab and others that way if something happens to them you can just put your back ups in place and your ready to rock again.


--------------------
--Jim Lester
jim@linuxhelp.net

Distro: Gentoo
System: AMD Athlon 3000+ XP 2.166 GHz
NVIDIA nForce2 IGP Chipset
1GB 333 MHz DDR SDRAM
NVIDIA nForce2 Dual Head 64 MB Graphics

Server Distro: CentOS
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Davi
post Apr 1 2004, 07:23 PM
Post #4


Whats this Lie-nix Thing?
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2
Joined: 1-April 04
Member No.: 2,693



ye i dont see what the big fuss is about logging in as r00t, as long as your careful and you pay attention to what your doing you'll be fine

p.s you can login as root through terminal by typing the following command:

su root

(just incase any of you readers out there didnt know)

smile.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
hughesjr
post Apr 1 2004, 09:10 PM
Post #5


Its GNU/Linuxhelp.net
*******

Group: Admin
Posts: 3,433
Joined: 25-July 03
From: Corpus Chrsiti, TX, USA
Member No.: 1,151



The reason not to login as root doesn't have anything to do with GUI.

The reason not to login as root is that you can easily break your system...and that holds true for GUI and Console mode.

One of the most hosed up thing about windows is that most people at home have administrator access when the open up a virus/worm infested e-mail and it totally screws up their system.

One of the best things about linux is that a normal user is not normally root.

I always have a root terminal window open in my GUI as another person ... just open a terminal window and after you see the prompt, type this command:

su - root

also, as another user, if you open Mandrake Control Center, it lets you enter the root password.

If you are careful, you can login as root, but it isn't really required.


--------------------
Johnny Hughes
hughesjr@linuxhelp.net
Enterprise Alternatives: CentOS, WhiteBoxEL
Favorite Workstation Distros (in order): CentOS, Gentoo, Debian Sarge, Ubuntu, Mandrake, FedoraCore, Slackware, SUSE
Favorite Server Distros (in order): CentOS, WhiteBoxEL, Debian Sarge, Slackware, Mandrake, FedoraCore, Gentoo, SUSE
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
gjhicks
post Apr 2 2004, 12:40 AM
Post #6


Whats this Lie-nix Thing?
*

Group: Members
Posts: 9
Joined: 1-April 04
Member No.: 2,690



Thanks for the series of helpful replies.

I guess the upshot is, log in as a 'normal' user with a gui and then just use a terminal window to log in as root (but only as and when actually required).

Thanks again.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
hughesjr
post Apr 2 2004, 07:56 AM
Post #7


Its GNU/Linuxhelp.net
*******

Group: Admin
Posts: 3,433
Joined: 25-July 03
From: Corpus Chrsiti, TX, USA
Member No.: 1,151



As far as jed is concerned ... the executeable is jed

Jed is on the CDs ... mandrake no longer includes the 9.0 x86 RPMS branch in their mirrors ... but I found my Mandrake 9.0 CDs:

In your CD's ... look at the CD-2 .... in the directory:

/mnt/cdrom/Mandrake/RPMS2

The packages I have on Mandrake 9.0 CD is:

jed-B0.99.15-2mdk.i586.rpm
jed-common-B0.99.15-2mdk.i586.rpm
jed-xjed-B0.99.15-2mdk.i586.rpm


To see if you already have it installed, do:

rpm -q jed

To install, use the command:

urpmi jed

if you don't have urpmi installed, use the command (with Mandrake 9.0 CD-2 mounted):

[/b]cd /mnt/cdrom/Mandrake/RPMS2
rpm -Uvh jed-B0.99.15-2mdk.i586.rpm jed-common-B0.99.15-2mdk.i586.rpm jed-xjed-B0.99.15-2mdk.i586.rpm[/b]

(all commands are as root in a terminal)


--------------------
Johnny Hughes
hughesjr@linuxhelp.net
Enterprise Alternatives: CentOS, WhiteBoxEL
Favorite Workstation Distros (in order): CentOS, Gentoo, Debian Sarge, Ubuntu, Mandrake, FedoraCore, Slackware, SUSE
Favorite Server Distros (in order): CentOS, WhiteBoxEL, Debian Sarge, Slackware, Mandrake, FedoraCore, Gentoo, SUSE
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 19th October 2017 - 06:09 AM